Hello from the team at Kay9 Services! 

Welcome to our  

Often Imitated - NEVER duplicated! 

Stay informed of all our news and events for the forthcoming months! 

At Kay9 Services, we have THE best customers and we really appreciate all the effort you put into training your dog and attending our regular events . 

Dogs at Christmas (Courtsey of The Dogs Trust) 
From your dog's perspective, Christmas is a time of the year when lots of unusual and exciting things are brought into your home, making it a very tempting time for them to get up to all sorts of mischief. Interesting foods, unusual plants and trees, attractive decorations and Christmas presents will all be of great interest to your dog, but some of these things may be harmful if eaten. 
 
Foods 
The list below may appear like a long list of things for your dog to avoid, but it is important to remember that they are not human, and that some human foods can be very dangerous to dogs. If you wish to give your dog a treat this Christmas, please ensure that it is something dog-friendly and avoid giving them the foods listed below. 
 
Chocolate 
Chocolate contains a chemical called theobromine, which is poisonous to dogs, as well as other animals such as cats, rodents and rabbits. Generally speaking, the darker and more expensive the chocolate, the more theobromine it contains, and therefore the more poisonous it is. White chocolate contains very little theobromine and so is unlikely to cause chocolate poisoning, but is still very fatty and can still make your dog ill. 
 
Chocolate can initially cause vomiting and diarrhoea, but is a stimulant and so can lead to your dog becoming excitable, as well as developing muscle twitching, tremors, fitting and life threatening problems with their heart. Severe cases can be fatal. 
 
Over the Christmas period make sure that all chocolate is out of the reach of your dog, this includes chocolate coins hung from your Christmas tree, advent calendars, boxes of chocolate put out on Christmas day and don't forget the wrapped chocolaty presents under your Christmas tree (just because its wrapped doesn't mean your dog can't smell it!). Although chocolate wrappers are not poisonous, they can cause an obstruction in the gut if eaten. This can be very dangerous and may require surgical intervention. Signs of an obstruction may include vomiting, lethargy, your dog being off their food, not defecating or finding it difficult to defecate. 
 
Raisins, grapes, currants and sultanas 
Grapes, raisins, currants and sultanas are all toxic to dogs and it is believed the dried forms of these fruits are more toxic than grapes. It is not known why these fruits are toxic to dogs, or how much is poisonous. Some dogs have eaten large quantities of this fruit and had no effects, while others have become unwell after very small amounts. 
 
At this time of year, it is therefore important that all foods that contain these fruits be kept away from your dog; these include Christmas cake, Christmas pudding, fruit cake, mince pies, stolen and especially chocolate covered raisins. 
 
As well as possibly causing vomiting and diarrhoea, these fruits can cause kidney failure, which can sometime be delayed for 24 to 72 hours. Kidney failure may sometimes present as a decrease in urination, your dog may also appear dull, or show signs of increased thirst. 
 
Prompt treatment is important. If your dog does eat any amount contact your veterinarian immediately. 
 
Macadamia nuts 
Why these nuts are poisonous to dogs is not known, but macadamia nuts can cause your dog to appear weak (particularly in their hind limbs), dull, sleepy and they can sometimes appear wobbly on their feet, or they may appear in pain or stiff when walking. Vomiting, tremors, lethargy and an increased body temperature can also occur. These effects usually appear within 12 hours and may last up to two days. 
 
Some macadamia nuts are covered in chocolate and so pose a double risk to dogs. 
 
Blue cheese 
Roquefort and other blue cheeses contain a substance called roquefortine C, which is a substance produced by the fungus used to produce these cheeses. Dogs appear sensitive to this substance and in more extreme cases can cause dogs to quickly develop muscle tremors and seizures, which may last for up to two days. 
 
Alcohol 
Dogs are believed to be more sensitive to ethanol than humans and so drinking even a small amount of alcohol can cause effects. Certain alcoholic drinks may be more appealing to dogs, such as cream or egg based drinks. Dogs may develop similar effects to those expected in humans, including becoming drowsy, wobbly on their feet and in more severe cases they can develop low body temperature, low blood sugar, seizures and coma. 
 
Bones 
When cooked, all bones become brittle and can easily splinter. Eating chicken, turkey or goose carcases may cause larger pieces of bone to cause an obstruction, while smaller pieces may irritate the gut, or even penetrate the stomach or intestinal wall, which may require surgery. 
 
When preparing your Christmas day meal, ensure that any meat is kept on the kitchen surface, or out of reach of your dog. When throwing away a carcass, take it to the outside bin, therefore avoiding any temptation for your dog to raid your kitchen bin during the night. 
 
Allium species 
Onions, garlic, leeks, shallots and chives all belong to the Allium family. These plants all contain a substance which can damage red blood cells in dogs and can cause life threatening anaemia. Signs may not present for a few days, but can include your dog vomiting, having diarrhoea or abdominal pain and they may appear sleepy, dull, weak, off their food and sometimes they may have rapid breathing. At Christmas ensure that your dog is kept away from sage and onion stuffing, onion based gravies or any other allium based foods. 
 
Rich Fatty Foods 
Many Christmas foods are very fatty or rich, and a festive overindulgence by your dog may result in a nasty bout of vomiting and diarrhoea. Large high fat meals can lead to pancreatitis, a very painful and serious condition, which can be costly to treat. 
 
Mouldy foods 
It's easy to overestimate how much food is needed over the Christmas period and some food may be thrown away. Mouldy foods can contain lots of different toxins and, if eaten, may make your dog ill. One particular substance, which is mostly found on mouldy dairy products, bread and nuts, can cause dogs to quickly develop muscle tremors and seizures, which may last for up to two days. If you compost your food scraps, then make sure that they are kept outside in a sealed container that your dog can not access. 
 
Plants 
Poinsettia 
Poinsettia is often said to be very toxic, but the potency of this plant is often greatly exaggerated. Whilst it may not be as poisonous as you think, it can still cause excessive salivation and sometimes vomiting. 
 
Holly 
This plant is generally considered to be of low toxicity, but the spikey leaves may cause physical damage if eaten, and the berries can cause vomiting and diarrhoea. 
 
Mistletoe 
This festive shrub is considered to be of low toxicity, but the berries may cause a tummy upset if eaten. Some reports suggest that mistletoe is very poisonous, but these refer to American mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescens), which is native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Americas, rather than European mistletoe (Viscum album), which is native to Europe. 
 
Ivy 
This vine may cause a tummy upset if eaten, while substantial or prolonged skin contact can cause severe irritation, or an allergic contact dermatitis. Not to be confused with American poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans), which is not commonly found in the UK. 
 
Potpourri 
Potpourri is made up of a number of dried plants and flowers. These fragrant decorations may cause, at the very least, vomiting and diarrhoea. How toxic your potpourri is will depend on which dried plants have been used. Identifying which plants are in your potpourri is often very difficult, especially as the dried plant matter are often artificially coloured. Potpourri often includes harder items, like pine cones or bark, and these could become stuck in your dog's throat and cause breathing difficulties, or an obstruction in their gut. This can be very dangerous and may require surgical intervention. Signs of an obstruction may include vomiting, lethargy, your dig being off their food, not defecating or finding it difficult to defecate. 
 
Christmas trees 
Most species of Christmas tree are of low toxicity, but oils from the needles may be irritating to the mouth and stomach, causing excessive salivation, vomiting and diarrhoea if chewed. Needles from these trees are sharp and can cause physical injury. 
 
Additional Christmas tree concerns. 
 
Tinsel, ornaments and Christmas tree lights may be enticing to your dog and may appear to be great toys, but they can cause and obstruction, or even gastric rupture if sharp, spikey or easily breakable. Christmas tree lights also may cause an electric shock if chewed. 
 
Antifreeze 
Care should be taken when using antifreeze products, which may contain the chemical ethylene glycol. Ethylene glycol can be lethal when ingested and its sweet taste may make it tempting for dogs. Antifreeze should therefore be stored in secure containers away from pets. If using antifreeze, make sure that your pets are kept well away and if any is spilt, ensure that it is cleaned up. Effects of poisoning may initially appear as vomiting, diarrhoea, weakness and the dog appearing drunk. An untreated poisoned dog may then appear to recover, but this may be followed by kidney failure. 
 
Prompt treatment is important. If your dog does drink or lick any amount contact your veterinarian immediately. 
 
Christmas presents 
Batteries 
If a battery is chewed and punctured by your dog it can cause chemical burns, or even heavy metal poisoning in very extreme cases. If swallowed whole, they are less likely to leak their contents, but can still cause a blockage. This can be very dangerous and may require surgical intervention. Signs of an obstruction may include vomiting, lethargy, being off their food, not defecating or finding it difficult to defecate. 
 
Button batteries that become stuck in the throat, or in the gut, can produce an electric current which can significantly damage the surrounding tissue. 
 
Silica gel sachets 
These small sachets are commonly found in the packaging of items such as new shoes, electrical items, handbags etc. Silica gel is non-toxic, but the sachet is often labelled "Do not eat", not because it is poisonous, but because it is not a food item and therefore should not be eaten. Although silica gel sachets are non-toxic, they could still cause a dangerous obstruction in the gut. 
 
Wrapping or crepe paper 
Eating wrapping paper or crepe paper may result in staining in and around the dogs mouth, which may look worrying, but both substances are of low toxicity and so unlikely to be poisonous. Eating a large amount however, may cause a potentially dangerous blockage in the gut. 
 
Toys 
During the excitement of Christmas, children's toys may appear appealing to dogs and parts of toys may be swallowed, causing a potentially dangerous blockage in your dog's gut. 
 
What to do if you are concerned that your dog may have eaten something that they shouldn't have? 
 
Consult your local veterinary practice immediately 
It is important that your veterinary practice make an informed decision as to whether your dog needs to be clinically assessed or treated. Where possible ensure that you tell them: 
 
What your dog has eaten 
How much has been eaten 
When it was eaten 
 
Do not try and make your dog sick. Trying to do this can sometimes cause other complications, which can make your dog unwell. 

Obedience Start Dates at a glance: 

Yateley - Friday Daytime  
(Click on links to the right to book) 
 
 
Mytchett - Thursday Evening 
(Click on links to the right to book) 
 
Mytchett - Tuesday Evening 
(Click on links to the right to book) 
 
 
NEW Yateley - Thursday Daytime  
New to popular demand! 
(Click on links to the right to book) 
 
8th February 2019 
Advanced 2pm 
24th January 2019 
Advanced 8.30pm 

Puppy Socialisation 

Our popular sessions, usually run on the first and the third Sunday of the month and occasionally we also run social walks just for puppies! 
 
Always check the on-line calendar first! 

It's FUN to FOCUS!  

We hold these when possible due to other events. It is advisable to always check the on line calendar first! 
 
These are held at our Hawley Venue. A must for dogs with a lack of self control and over excitement! 

Various Workshops 

Recall (part one and two), Loose Lead and Reactivity (part one and two), - as well as many others presented all over the UK 
 
We are now booking for the next round of workshops locally. 

Private Workshops 

Team up with your fellow dog owner friends for a workshops designed to your very own needs and share the cost between you and your friends, tailor made to your requirements! 

Please book early to avoid disappointment! 
We look forward to hearing from you and thank you for your valued support 

 

 
I have again been invited by the Kennel Club, to apply for nominations for the 
KCAI Dog Trainer of the Year 2018 Award! 
 
Nominations for the prestigious Kennel Club Accredited Instructors Scheme (KCAI Scheme) 2018 Trainer of the Year award have officially opened. 
 
Last year, hundreds of clients proudly nominated their KCAI Scheme dog training instructor, by highlighting how they believed they made a truly positive difference to dogs. 
 
The Kennel Club Accredited Instructors Scheme (KCAI Scheme) recognizes and promotes dog training instructors, who have undertaken to abide by the scheme’s code of practice which has the welfare, care and needs of the dog at heart. 
 
Nominations are now open and I would be very grateful for your support. Thank you. 

Crufts 2018: Kay (2nd from the right) receives her award with fellow finalists and winner Barry Harris. 
 
 
There is only one Kay9 - Thats the Kay9® Way!  
Second to non for all your dogs needs! 

PUPPY SOCIALISATION SESSIONS 
16th December 2018 
St. Johns Ambulance, Youth Activity Centre, Hawley, Farnborough, Hants.  
 
1-2pm 
£10 per Puppy 

 
These sessions are held on occasional Sundays. Please see the website calendar for session dates.  
 
Puppy's up to 8 months of age only - Please bring your puppies bed, a stuffed Kong and your puppies favourite treats and your vaccination certificate if you have not attended a Kay9 event before. 
 
Social Skill is such an important aspect of puppy hood and should therefore be carried out in the correct manner. Watch your puppy interact with other puppies, learning positive social skills on and off lead in a controlled environment. 
 
A social interaction through play with various toys and lots of other distractions. 
 
A great opportunity for your puppy to learn at its own pace how to interact and explore their surroundings, along with people and puppies present. 
 
 

Ask us about our puppy social walks! 

PUPPY  
LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION TRAINING! 
Strictly Bookings Only! 
 
 
£35.00 for 4 pre-booked sessions (held on a Monday and Wednesday afternoon) 
 
Meet us and other puppy owners in the REAL world, to practice real life situations in places you may need to help your puppy to get used to. We teach calm behaviours in every day environments. For example: 
 
The Pub - Learning to settle and be calm. Greet appropriately and ignore their surroundings 
The Park - Practicing behaviours in an environment where there are distractions, appropriate greeting behaviours, no jumping up etc 
 
The Pet Shop 
The Park 
The Pub 
The Garden Center 
The Grooming Parlour 
The Cafe 
The School Run 
Walking in a busy road 
 
and many more! 
 

 
WORKSHOPS - The Kay9® Way!  
Recall Prt 1 & 2 £60.00: 
2nd February 2019 - Part 1 
20th April 2019 - Part 2 
 
Loose Lead 
2nd February 2019 - £ 35.00 
 
Next Sessions: 
 
2nd February 2019 & 20th April 2019 
 
 

Book BOTH Recall & Loose Lead workshops for only £60.00! 
Book early to avoid disappointment! 

REACTIVE PART ONE - The Kay9® Way! 
 
Next Sessions: 
2nd February 2019 
20th April 2019 
 
 

 
REACTIVE PART TWO - The Kay9® Way! 
TBA 
 
Price £35.00 - (Payment in full required on booking) 
 

NEW WORKSHOP! 
Prey Drive 1 & 2: 
 
Does your dog like to chase things? 
 
Bikes? Squirrels? Other dogs? Cats? Birds etc? 
 
Contact us for a workshop to help with this!  
Email info@kay9services.co.uk for more information. 
 
 
Next Session: 
2nd February 2019 Part One 
20th April 2019 Part Two 
 
 
Part 1 will put into place all the foundation behaviours required in order to change your dogs chasing behaviours. We need to create new tools and new habits for you and your dog! 
 
Part 2 we practice putting these new learned foundation skills into practice for results that work! 

ADULT DOG SOCIAL WALKS 
The Kay9® Way! 
Strictly bookings only! 
(See Calendar for details) 

Costs: 
Assessment of dog prior to attending a walk - £ 25.00 
Assigned a trainer to walk with you and your dog throughout the walk - £ 15.00 
Unassisted Walks - £10 for first dog, £8 for additional dog from same household 
 
Great exercise and fun for your dog AND you! 

Please note that new dogs need to be assessed before attending these walks.  
Please contact us to arrange this prior to attending a walk 

Private Workshops -The Kay9® Way!  
 
We offer tailored workshops to suit your needs.  
 
Why not get together with some friends for a private session with our trainer and behaviourist to perfect a few issues you may have? All dogs should be comfortable in the presence of each other, although ample space will be provided where necessary 
 
Recall, Retrieve, Loose Lead, Impulse Control, General Obedience, Behavioural - You choose the subject! 
 
Only £150 Per workshop ( ie under £40 for 4 friends sharing or less when more friends join you. Max 8 friends per workshop)!  
EMAIL US FOR MORE DETAILS 
info@kay9services.co.uk 
 

Could you voluntarily foster a dog or cat? 
 
Long or short term!? 
 
Fostering involves assisting a rescue centre by fostering dogs that are perhaps not coping with the confinement and stress of kennels. 
 
Often a homeless dog stands a better chance of being adopted from a foster home when they are not suffering from stress and therefore able to show their true personality. You will be helping to alleviate this suffering by enabling a dog to have some return to normality instead of the traumatic confinement of kennels. 
 
This is also helpful to a rescue centre as it enables them to free up kennel space and therefore assist more dogs in need. 
 
Most organisations will request that foster carers are home based or do not leave a foster dog for longer than 4 hours. All fostering agreements differ, so please ensure you discuss this fully when applying. 

 
 
07763 356 338 

 
 
07762 806191 

 
 
 
07766 021 465 

If you would like to contribute to the next edition of this newsletter please email us on  

Passionate about dogs - Positive about training! 
The Kay9® Way! 

The Home of Professional Dog Training 

 
Kay9® Services - The training of 'choice' 
 
YOUR best choice 
Your DOGS best choice 
The Dog Trainers Choice! 
 

Call Us On 
0775 8288 478 or 01276 25544 
and we will assess the training needs of your pet 
 
 
Or Book Online 
"Money can buy you a great dog - but it wont buy you the wag of its tail"! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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